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Fundamental Studies of Passive, Active and Semi-active Automotive Suspension Systems

Hassan, Samy Aly (1986) Fundamental Studies of Passive, Active and Semi-active Automotive Suspension Systems. PhD thesis, University of Leeds.

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Abstract

The fundamental properties of various automotive suspension systems are theoretically investigated on the basis of simple vehicle models subjected to realistic inputs chosen to represent road surfaces of different qualities. The vehicle response is evaluated through a performance index representing ride comfort, dynamic tyre load and suspension working space parameters, and interpreted in the light of these individual parameters together with the implications of the suspension design for attitude control and steering behaviour. Linear analysis procedures are followed in studying the passive, active and slow-active suspension systems while suitable simulations are used for the non-linear semi-active suspension systems. Linear optimal control theory is used to determine the optimal parameters of the active and slow-active suspension systems. Semi-active suspension behaviours are evaluated on the basis of applying the optimal active parameters to each system, but the semi-active damper can only dissipate energy and switches off when external power would be needed for the system to follow the optimal active control law. Results are generated and discussed for each of these types of system and their performance capabilities are compared with each other. Conclusions concerning the practical viability of each of the systems are drawn.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Academic Units: The University of Leeds > Faculty of Engineering (Leeds) > School of Mechanical Engineering (Leeds)
Depositing User: Digitisation Studio Leeds
Date Deposited: 10 Aug 2012 08:43
Last Modified: 07 Mar 2014 11:21
URI: http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/2691

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