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Using multiple disciplines to investigate coastal storms in the UK: considering environmental records and social perceptions

Holmes, Thomas (2017) Using multiple disciplines to investigate coastal storms in the UK: considering environmental records and social perceptions. PhD thesis, University of York.

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Thomas Holmes PhD - Using multiple disciplines to investigate coastal storms in the UK.pdf - Examined Thesis (PDF)
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Abstract

Global climate change poses risks to the environment and to society. These effects are pertinent on the coast, where projected increases in storm frequency and magnitude threaten low-lying ecosystems and communities. Numerous benefits are derived from coastal ecosystems, which are important to wellbeing, including flood protection, food provision and recreation. Storm effects on coastal ecosystems are highly variable and potential impacts on the non-monetary values and psychological benefits (e.g. restoration) derived from spending time on the coast are little understood. This research considers methods from environmental science and environmental psychology to evaluate storm effects on saltmarshes and how these storms can shape the psychological benefits derived from the coast. Saltmarsh sedimentary analyses alongside quantitative, qualitative and spatial analysis of survey data were employed in two UK coastal areas; Spurn Point (Humber Estuary) and Silverdale (Morecambe Bay). This research highlights the importance of cross-disciplinary approaches to facilitate a holistic understanding and long-term perspective for effective and democratic coastal management.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Keywords: storms; coasts; floods; saltmarsh; geochemistry; geochronology; saltmarsh storm records; restorative environments; risk perception; values; climate change risk; integrated coastal zone management; North Sea; Irish Sea; UK;
Academic Units: The University of York > Environment (York)
Depositing User: Mr Thomas Holmes
Date Deposited: 04 Jun 2019 13:38
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2019 13:38
URI: http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/24032

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