White Rose University Consortium logo
University of Leeds logo University of Sheffield logo York University logo

Style and tradition in string quartet performance: a study of 32 recordings of Beethoven's op. 131 quartet.

Turner, Richard John (2004) Style and tradition in string quartet performance: a study of 32 recordings of Beethoven's op. 131 quartet. PhD thesis, University of Sheffield.

[img] Text (412189_vol1.pdf)
412189_vol1.pdf

Download (54Mb)
[img] Text (412189_vol2.pdf)
412189_vol2.pdf

Download (23Mb)

Abstract

Thirty-two recordings of the Op. 131 string quartet by Beethoven, dating from 1924 to 1995, are compared to examine questions concerning changes and differnces in the performance style of string quartets. The background and historical context of the ensembles involved are explored and discussed, and the recordings are analysed using a number of objective measurement techniques. Aspects of performance style including choice of tempo, tempo flexibility, portamento and vibrato are measured and subjected to statistical analysis in order to determine the existence of trends over time or other stylistic groupings. Current theories and assumptions concerning historical change and national styles of performance are tested in the light of this evidence. It is concluded that the aspects of performance style studied offer no support for theories of national style or the influence of teaching, and that historic trends can only be partially substantiated in the case of portamento and vibrato. The evidence as a whole suggests a wide diversity of performance style at all periods, and contrasts with the conclusions of previous studies in other musical genres including solo instrumental and orchestral. Consideration of this evidence against the background of performance philosophy and some sociological studies of string quartets leads to the conclusion that the string quartet ensemble is uniquely constituted to encourage a searching, co-operative and innovative approach to the development of a performance-oriented interpretation and to discourage the thoughtless ossification of a handed-down performance template.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Academic Units: The University of Sheffield > Faculty of Arts and Humanities (Sheffield) > Music (Sheffield)
Identification Number/EthosID: uk.bl.ethos.412189
Depositing User: EThOS Import Sheffield
Date Deposited: 31 May 2016 13:49
Last Modified: 31 May 2016 13:49
URI: http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/12790

You do not need to contact us to get a copy of this thesis. Please use the 'Download' link(s) above to get a copy.
You can contact us about this thesis. If you need to make a general enquiry, please see the Contact us page.

Actions (repository staff only: login required)