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The Dialect of New mills: Linguistic Change in a North-West Derbyshire Community

Fyne, Jon (2005) The Dialect of New mills: Linguistic Change in a North-West Derbyshire Community. PhD thesis, University of Sheffield.

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Abstract

Abstract This research has two primary aims, both of which are intrinsically linked: firstly, to provide a description of the traditional dialect of New Mills on the levels of phonology (a systematic description), grammar and lexis; secondly, to analyse linguistic change that is currently occurring within the traditional dialect. The first of these aims is achieved by analysing the speech of the oldest members of the community. A qualitative age-based comparison enables the second objective to be undertaken. In order to record the traditional dialect, informants were selected who were most likely to use this stratum of speech (i.e. older working class male informants). Moreover, as this is essentially a study of linguistic change in apparent time, all independent variables, except age, are kept constant. Thus the data is taken from a socially homogenous group of speakers, who only vary by age, ranging from retired persons to teenagers. Theoretically, this should enable an analysis of change within the traditional dialect only, and thus provide a clearer picture as to the extent and nature of the change in progress. Attention is focused upon standardisation and / or levelling within the traditional dialect, and the possible factors, both linguistic and extra-linguistic (e.g., cultural / attitudinal) behind these processes.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Academic Units: The University of Sheffield > Faculty of Arts and Humanities (Sheffield) > School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics (Sheffield)
Depositing User: Dr Jon Fyne
Date Deposited: 12 Jan 2011 10:24
Last Modified: 08 Aug 2013 08:45
URI: http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/1094

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