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Combining persuasive technology and behaviour change techniques to support health behaviour change in people with COPD

Bartlett, Yvonne Kiera (2015) Combining persuasive technology and behaviour change techniques to support health behaviour change in people with COPD. PhD thesis, University of Sheffield.

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Abstract

Background: Persuasive technology is a term used to describe ‘any interactive computing system designed to change people’s attitudes or behaviours’ (Fogg, 2003, p.1). This thesis seeks to explore how persuasive technology could be combined with behaviour change techniques (BCTs) and used to help people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (PwCOPD) to make changes to their health behaviours. Methods: Two systematic reviews with meta-analyses were conducted to identify BCTs associated with effective interventions in this population (Study 1 and 2). A series of mixed-methods, N-of-1 studies were used to assess an existing persuasive technology (a mobile phone app) with PwCOPD (Study 3). And finally, interviews and surveys were used to collect the opinions of key stakeholders towards the use of persuasive technology to increase physical activity in PwCOPD (Study 4). Results: Study 1 identified that self-regulatory BCTs were effective in smoking cessation interventions for PwCOPD. Study 2 identified that intervention components that targeted physical activity delivered as part of a multi-faceted intervention were most effective. Study 3 showed that the mobile phone app was used daily, five of the seven participants increased their mean daily step count, although greater support would be needed to set independent physical activity goals. Study 4 found that there was support for persuasive technology to take a more active role to encourage physical activity. However, incorporating aspects such as competition divided opinion. Discussion: The findings reported illustrate the potential of combining persuasive technology with BCTs to support behaviour changes in PwCOPD. This approach was largely found to be acceptable and strategies to increase both the acceptance, and the utility, of this approach are suggested. Future research should continue to explore how best to use BCTs in conjunction with persuasive technology to support and encourage PwCOPD to makes changes to their health behaviours.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Academic Units: The University of Sheffield > Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health (Sheffield)
The University of Sheffield > Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health (Sheffield) > School of Health and Related Research (Sheffield)
Identification Number/EthosID: uk.bl.ethos.634356
Depositing User: Miss Yvonne Kiera Bartlett
Date Deposited: 22 Jan 2015 15:55
Last Modified: 12 Oct 2018 09:22
URI: http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/7821

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