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A Study Of Gamblers And Gaming Culture In London, c. 1780-1844: emerging strategic reasoning in a culture of conspicuous consumption

Pitt, Arthur (2012) A Study Of Gamblers And Gaming Culture In London, c. 1780-1844: emerging strategic reasoning in a culture of conspicuous consumption. MA by research thesis, University of York.

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Abstract

Gambling has long been knitted into the culture of the English, occupying the leisure time of rich and poor alike. Therefore it is surprising that the subject has escaped much scrutiny or interest from historians. This thesis takes a closer look at English gambling in the late 18th and early 19th century. It examines the role of gambling in Aristocratic London clubs through a case study of White's Club betting book. It moves further afield to examine the changing styles of contemporary gaming publications, and the prominence of luck, skill and probability therein. A study of Scrope Berdmore Davies offers a snapshot of a character heavily embroiled in the clubs and racecourses of England. Finally, the thesis examines the evidence given at the 1844 Select Committee on Gaming, and attempts to understand the driving factors behind legal changes enacted in the 1845 Gambling Act. This study not only fills large gaps in the historiography, but also offers an interpretation of gambling history coloured by a fundamental understanding of the games and wagers described.

Item Type: Thesis (MA by research)
Academic Units: The University of York > History (York)
Depositing User: Mr Arthur Pitt
Date Deposited: 01 Mar 2013 17:02
Last Modified: 08 Aug 2013 08:51
URI: http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/3291

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