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Mystery as a theological theme in the writings of Marilynne Robinson

Dnes, Jennifer Margaret (2019) Mystery as a theological theme in the writings of Marilynne Robinson. MA by research thesis, University of Leeds.

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Abstract

The novels of Marilynne Robinson have been seen as the primary source of insight into her theological reflections. The purpose of this study is to challenge this assumption by claiming that her essays are an essential theological companion to her novels. The study explores the theme of mystery in Robinson’s essays and selects three episodes from the Gilead trilogy to show how the same theme emerges in the novels. The study also claims that Robinson employs contrasting methods of discourse to express a common theology across the two genres. A conceptual model developed by Rowan Williams in his book The Edge of Words is used as a framework to demonstrate this claim. Finally, the study suggests that Robinson’s open approach to religious thought has the potential to appeal beyond the confines of Christian orthodoxy. In summary, by offering a unified approach to Robinson’s theology across both genres, the study seeks to provide an innovative perspective on her overall work.

Item Type: Thesis (MA by research)
Academic Units: The University of Leeds > Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Cultures (Leeds)
The University of Leeds > Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Cultures (Leeds) > School of Philosophy, Religion and the History of Science
Depositing User: Ms Jennifer Margaret Dnes
Date Deposited: 13 May 2020 07:50
Last Modified: 29 Jun 2020 07:06
URI: http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/26393

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