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N-body simulations of star forming regions

Arnold, Becky (2019) N-body simulations of star forming regions. PhD thesis, University of Sheffield.

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Abstract

This thesis contains a body of work using N-body simulations and numerical methods to study star forming regions. It begins by introducing relevant topics, such as the basic picture of star formation, the en- vironment(s) that stars form in, stellar dynamics, and statistical methods of analysing star forming regions. In the following chapter information is provided surrounding the computational methods used by the field to simulate star forming regions. N-body simulations are described in particular detail. This alternative format thesis then includes the paper ‘How do binary clusters form?’ (Arnold et al. 2017) which details a study into the origins of binary clusters. Using N-body sim- ulations it concludes that binary clusters may originate from single star forming regions which divide in two. The next paper presented in this alternative format thesis is ‘A method to analyse velocity structure’ (Arnold & Goodwin 2019), which presents a statistical method for analysing the velocity structure of star forming regions (although the method also has wider capabilities). The third paper presented is ‘The velocity structure of Cygnus OB2’ (Arnold et al. 2019; submitted) which applies the method presented in Arnold & Goodwin (2019) to observations of the Cygnus OB2 association. The results are used to investigate and interpret the region’s dynamical history. The fourth paper presented is ‘Dynamical evolution of star-forming regions: III. Unbound stars and predictions for Gaia’ (Schoettler et al. 2019), a study conducted in conjunction with C. Schoettler and a number of others. My contribution to this project is clearly outlined at the start of this chapter.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Academic Units: The University of Sheffield > Faculty of Science (Sheffield) > Physics and Astronomy (Sheffield)
Depositing User: Dr Becky Arnold
Date Deposited: 02 Mar 2020 09:51
Last Modified: 02 Mar 2020 09:51
URI: http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/26033

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