White Rose University Consortium logo
University of Leeds logo University of Sheffield logo York University logo

The Political Economy of Social Protection in Cameroon: State and Non-state Approaches

Vudinga, Blaise Fofung (2017) The Political Economy of Social Protection in Cameroon: State and Non-state Approaches. PhD thesis, University of York.

[img]
Preview
Text
Blaise FINAL PhD (Resubmission) May 16.pdf - Examined Thesis (PDF)
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales.

Download (3536Kb) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Text
Blaise FINAL PhD (Resubmission) May 16.pdf - Examined Thesis (PDF)
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales.

Download (3536Kb) | Preview

Abstract

In many Low-Middle Income Countries, social protection policies are increasingly used as integral parts of development strategies to combat poverty and inequality. This study contributes to the effectiveness of social protection interventions by exploring unstudied social protection schemes and demonstrating how state and non-state approaches shape the production and distribution of social protection resources in Cameroon. Using a constructivist epistemology, the study traces the historical and institutional development of social protection and situates it within Cameroon’s development context and global debates on social protection. The study is based on the underlying concepts of risk and vulnerability, and the World Bank’s SRM framework and uses a qualitative-based and indigenous approach to generate findings. First, findings suggest that there is a proliferation of both state and non-state interventions that typically provide adhoc and patchwork assistance and resources to beneficiaries. These resources support individuals to manage basic risks and shocks within households but have limited coverage. Second, the study demonstrated that both political and bureaucratic stakeholders are crucial for the development of a viable social protection system in Cameroon. Bureaucratic stakeholders possess indepth knowledge about the structural and institutional challenges to delivering social protection resources, whilst political stakeholders outline technical and structural difficulties to delivering social protection including problems conceptualising risk and vulnerability. Third, the study challenges the premise of the World Bank’s SRM framework which reinforces the role of the state as the main social protection provider by arguing that informal social protection interventions, such as BAMCULA and SN CHAUTAC, are equally crucial in alleviating poverty and inequality. Finally, the study contributes to the methodological advancement of social protection research especially in African settings, by proposing the incorporation of indigenous methods and highlighting that policymakers must have a clear vision and coherent principles regarding social protection.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Academic Units: The University of York > Social Policy and Social Work (York)
Depositing User: Blaise Fofung Vudinga
Date Deposited: 10 Oct 2019 11:36
Last Modified: 10 Oct 2019 11:36
URI: http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/24618

You do not need to contact us to get a copy of this thesis. Please use the 'Download' link(s) above to get a copy.
You can contact us about this thesis. If you need to make a general enquiry, please see the Contact us page.

Actions (repository staff only: login required)