White Rose University Consortium logo
University of Leeds logo University of Sheffield logo York University logo

The social work interview : structure, content and verbal behaviour : a model for understanding and teaching interview skills based on an analysis of tape recorded interviews.

Berkson, Jennifer (1990) The social work interview : structure, content and verbal behaviour : a model for understanding and teaching interview skills based on an analysis of tape recorded interviews. PhD thesis, University of Sheffield.

[img] Text (385620_Vol1.pdf)
385620_Vol1.pdf

Download (5Mb)
[img] Text (385620_Vol2.pdf)
385620_Vol2.pdf

Download (7Mb)
[img] Text (385620_Vol3.pdf)
385620_Vol3.pdf

Download (6Mb)

Abstract

The research involved an analysis of 40 tape recorded interviews between social workers and their clients in the Greater Manchester area over 1983/4. The sample covered a wide range of clients in a number of different settings. The main aim of the study was to construct a theoretical model for the analysis of interviews for the purpose of further research and for teaching. The interviews were searched and re-searched and all worker utterances noted and codified. A 12 category system of verbal behaviours eventually emerged: open questions, closed questions, giving information, offering practical help, interpretation, worker self-revelation, support, challenge, reflection of content, reflection of feeling and listening. The content, structure and development of interviews was also examined. Each variable was examined across interviews with reference to its frequency, its relationship to other variables and to interview content. The sub-types of each verbal behaviour was examined, together with its usage and client reactions to it. It was found that interviews varied greatly as to form and structure. Content varied less; practical problems and relationship problems featured in most exchanges. The dominant verbal behaviour was asking questions backed up with reflections of content to keep the client talking. There was also a great deal of information and advice given. Open questions and reflections of feeling [counselling techniques] were relatively little used and there was little evidence of participative discussion with the client. From the research data it was possible to construct a model for learning about interviews for use by fieldwork supervisors with their students.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Keywords: Sociology
Academic Units: The University of Sheffield > Faculty of Social Sciences (Sheffield) > Sociological Studies (Sheffield)
Identification Number/EthosID: uk.bl.ethos.385620
Depositing User: EThOS Import Sheffield
Date Deposited: 16 Sep 2019 13:28
Last Modified: 16 Sep 2019 13:28
URI: http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/21768

You do not need to contact us to get a copy of this thesis. Please use the 'Download' link(s) above to get a copy.
You can contact us about this thesis. If you need to make a general enquiry, please see the Contact us page.

Actions (repository staff only: login required)