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Considering the use of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) in Inferring the Relationship Between Long-Distance Trade and Animal Mummification in Ancient Egypt.

Craston, James (2017) Considering the use of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) in Inferring the Relationship Between Long-Distance Trade and Animal Mummification in Ancient Egypt. MA by research thesis, University of York.

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Abstract

From a consideration of existing literary and biochemical analyses, it can be suggested that imported ingredients were regularly utlised in the process of anthropogenic animal mummification in Ancient Egypt. Through the use of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) of 27 mummified animal remains (supplied by Buckley & Tunney and Buckley & Fletcher) this thesis identified the presence of imported embalming agents in 75% of the samples tested. From the data provided, this study was able to consider the potential relationship between the mummification of animals, and trade networks across the ancient world.

Item Type: Thesis (MA by research)
Academic Units: The University of York > Archaeology (York)
Depositing User: Mr James Craston
Date Deposited: 11 Jun 2018 09:40
Last Modified: 11 Jun 2018 09:40
URI: http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/20401

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