White Rose University Consortium logo
University of Leeds logo University of Sheffield logo York University logo

Cognitive Analytic Therapy (CAT): A review of the outcome evidence and an investigation of the effectiveness of group CAT for female survivors of childhood sexual abuse.

Simmonds, Rachel (2011) Cognitive Analytic Therapy (CAT): A review of the outcome evidence and an investigation of the effectiveness of group CAT for female survivors of childhood sexual abuse. DClinPsy thesis, University of Sheffield.

[img] Text
Simmonds,_Rachel.pdf
Temporary Embargo (access restricted until embargo expiry date) until 30 November 2016.

Request a copy

Abstract

Efficacy and Effectiveness of Cognitive Analytic Therapy: A Review of the Outcome Evidence Despite the popularity of Cognitive Analytic Therapy (CAT), the evidence-base is limited in comparison with some other psychotherapies. No review has been previously undertaken to evaluate the nascent evidence-base and guide future research. Reviewing 21 papers revealed that the evidence-base for CAT has largely bypassed the rigours of efficacy trials. A between-studies effect size of 0.81 across nine studies indicates promising effectiveness across diagnostic conditions. However, there is a need to conduct larger-scale research, in line with established frameworks, to develop a coherent, robust and relevant knowledge-base. Group Cognitive Analytic Therapy for Female Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse: A practice-based study A practice-based study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of 24-session group Cognitive Analytic Therapy (GCAT) for adult female survivors of childhood sexual abuse (CSA). Validated measures of psychological functioning were administered at assessment, start and completion of GCAT. Statistically significant improvements were observed for intention-to-treat and ‘completer’ samples. ‘Completer’ analysis indicated an uncontrolled pre/post treatment effect size of 0.34. Reliable and clinically significant improvements in global functioning were achieved by 8% (n=8) of ‘completers’. Given the severity of distress experienced by this sample and previous contact with mental health services, GCAT as an adjunct to secondary mental health clinical care, appears to be a promising intervention for adult female survivors of CSA. Clinical, organisational and theoretical implications are discussed and future directions for research identified.

Item Type: Thesis (DClinPsy)
Keywords: cognitive-analytic therapy survivors
Academic Units: The University of Sheffield > Faculty of Science (Sheffield) > Psychology (Sheffield)
Depositing User: Dr Rachel Simmonds
Date Deposited: 16 Dec 2011 16:58
Last Modified: 08 Aug 2013 08:47
URI: http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/1961

Actions (repository staff only: login required)