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The Pickup and Multiple Delivery Problem

Mourdjis, Philip James (2016) The Pickup and Multiple Delivery Problem. EngD thesis, University of York.

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Abstract

This thesis presents my work on the pickup and multiple delivery problem, a real-world vehicle routing and scheduling problem with soft time windows, working time and last-in-first-out constraints, developed in collaboration with Transfaction Ltd., who conduct logistics analysis for several large retailers in the UK. A summary of relevant background literature is presented highlighting where my research fits into and contributes to the broader academic landscape. I present a detailed model of the problem and thoroughly analyse a case-study data set, obtaining distributions used for further research. A new variable neighbourhood descent with memory hyper-heuristic is presented and shown to be an effective technique for solving instances of the real-world problem. I analyse strategies for cooperation and competition amongst haulage companies and quantify their effectiveness. The value of time and timely information for planning pickup and delivery requests is investigated. The insights gained are of real industrial relevance, highlighting how a variety of business decisions can produce significant cost savings.

Item Type: Thesis (EngD)
Academic Units: The University of York > Computer Science (York)
Identification Number/EthosID: uk.bl.ethos.727327
Depositing User: Mr Philip James Mourdjis
Date Deposited: 28 Nov 2017 13:00
Last Modified: 24 Jul 2018 15:23
URI: http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/18582

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