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Cardiac X-ray Context Sensitive Imaging

Kengyelics, Stephen Mark (2017) Cardiac X-ray Context Sensitive Imaging. PhD thesis, University of Leeds.

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Kengyelics_SM_Medicine_PhD_2017.pdf - Final eThesis - complete (pdf)
Restricted until 1 February 2037.

Abstract

Over the past two decades there have been significant advances in the technology used in the field of cardiac X-ray imaging with the advent of fully digital X-ray detectors. However, the means by which the advantages of this technology are implemented at a systems level remain basic. Most modern cardiac X-ray imaging systems employ feedback control to maintain an adequate average output signal level to the X-ray detector based on the attenuation properties of the patient. This approach is not necessarily optimal over the range of clinical imaging tasks for an individual, or over an anthropomorphically heterogeneous population. Within this thesis methods are presented for extracting dynamic real-time information from within cardiac image sequences that are suitable for incorporation in automatic dose rate control systems that regulate their output based on clinically relevant image quality metrics. A framework is proposed that combines image quality metrics for contrast and noise on a per image frame basis to provide an overall indicator of image acceptability. These metrics are compared to the performance of experienced clinical observers. The methods presented have a wider applicability to other X-ray procedures that use dynamic imaging of blood vessels made visible by the use of contrast agents.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Academic Units: The University of Leeds > Faculty of Engineering (Leeds) > School of Computing (Leeds)
The University of Leeds > Faculty of Medicine and Health (Leeds) > School of Medicine (Leeds)
Depositing User: DR STEPHEN KENGYELICS
Date Deposited: 22 Sep 2017 09:36
Last Modified: 22 Sep 2017 09:36
URI: http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/18217

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