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Nanotechnology for corrosion control Silsesquioxane based nanofillers for iron carbonate film enhancement

Taleb, Wassim (2016) Nanotechnology for corrosion control Silsesquioxane based nanofillers for iron carbonate film enhancement. PhD thesis, University of Leeds.

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Abstract

Carbon dioxide internal corrosion is one of the most common degradation mechanisms occurring in oil and gas exploration and production environments when carbon steel is the material of construction. Both general and localized attack can lead to severe production cuts and safety incidents and these are commonly mitigated via the use of corrosion inhibitors, the deployment of which significantly increases the operational expenditure. When environmental conditions are favourable, a naturally growing corrosion product known as iron carbonate precipitates onto the internal pipe wall providing protection from degradation but only when it is well adherent to the surface and compact. To date, research trying to take advantage of the protective abilities of these naturally growing films is limited. The aim of this research is to encourage the iron carbonate kinetics of formation but also its mechanical properties via the addition of a hybrid organic-inorganic molecule to mimic the formation of a nanocomposite. This should allow for the modified iron carbonate to better resist mechanical removal in order to sustain its naturally inherent steel protection properties over a wider range of environmental conditions. Electrochemical results show how the addition of a silsesquioxane-based nanofiller acts as nucleating agent and accelerates the build-up of the iron carbonate corrosion products. Mechanical properties such as hardness and modulus extracted from nanoindentation tests ascertain that the modified corrosion products are more robust. This thesis describes a novel approach relying on the protectiveness of the corrosion layer growing in situ in oil and gas transport systems to mitigate carbon steel dissolution in specific environmental conditions. It is anticipated that the benefits of such a batch treatment of the nanofiller would be greater than for conventional film-forming inhibitors.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Keywords: Carbon dioxide corrosion, iron carbonate, Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane
Academic Units: The University of Leeds > Faculty of Engineering (Leeds)
The University of Leeds > Faculty of Engineering (Leeds) > School of Mechanical Engineering (Leeds)
The University of Leeds > Faculty of Engineering (Leeds) > School of Mechanical Engineering (Leeds) > Institute of Engineering Thermofluids, Surfaces & Interfaces (iETSI) (Leeds)
Identification Number/EthosID: uk.bl.ethos.721804
Depositing User: Dr Wassim Taleb
Date Deposited: 16 Aug 2017 10:13
Last Modified: 25 Jul 2018 09:55
URI: http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/17863

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