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Indirect exposure to client trauma and the impact on trainee clinical psychologists: secondary traumatic stress or vicarious traumatization?

Makadia, Rakhee (2011) Indirect exposure to client trauma and the impact on trainee clinical psychologists: secondary traumatic stress or vicarious traumatization? DClinPsy thesis, University of Sheffield.

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Abstract

This thesis consists of a literature review and research report. Section 1: Literature Review Constructs of secondary traumatic stress (STS) and vicarious traumatization (VT) have been proposed to describe the negative impact of working with traumatized clients. In previous reviews of the literature, evidence to support these constructs has been limited and inconsistent; consequently their validity has been questioned. This review seeks to reassess the evidence from recent empirical findings. The review concluded that evidence to support the constructs remains limited, but tentatively there is greater evidence to support STS in contrast to VT. Section 2: Research Report This study investigates the extent of exposure to trauma work among trainee clinical psychologists and its impact on well-being. The study seeks to assess which theoretical model (STS, VT, or even a non-specific model of general psychological distress) best accounts for any negative effects associated with indirect exposure to client trauma. 564 trainees participated in an online survey, which included self-report measures of general psychological distress, trauma symptoms and disrupted beliefs. Most trainees had caseloads of 1-2 trauma cases, with the most common trauma being sexual abuse. Exposure to trauma work was not related to general psychological distress or disrupted beliefs, but was a significant predictor of trauma symptoms. Level of stress of clinical work and quality of trauma training contributed to the variance in trauma symptoms. It is concluded that the study provides support for STS and lacks evidence to support VT or a non-specific model of general psychological distress.

Item Type: Thesis (DClinPsy)
Academic Units: The University of Sheffield > Faculty of Science (Sheffield) > Psychology (Sheffield)
Depositing User: Mrs Rakhee Makadia
Date Deposited: 19 Oct 2011 09:55
Last Modified: 08 Aug 2013 08:47
URI: http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/1710

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