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Regulating Electronic Commerce and Transactions in Kuwait: An Evaluation of Law No. 20 of 2014 Concerning Electronic Transactions, with Comparison to the UK and GCC Countries Laws.

Almutairi, Yousef F. M. S. (2016) Regulating Electronic Commerce and Transactions in Kuwait: An Evaluation of Law No. 20 of 2014 Concerning Electronic Transactions, with Comparison to the UK and GCC Countries Laws. PhD thesis, University of Leeds.

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Abstract

International and regional organizations and governments are increasingly interested in regulation of information technology. Laws are needed for e-transactions to combat electronic crimes and address issues related to cyberspace and Internet users. There has been an acceleration in the issuance of legislation governing this area. The laws are aimed at dealing with legal issues, removal of barriers, and increasing consumer confidence in such technology. This research is primarily designed to evaluate Law No. 20 of 2014 Concerning E-transactions in Kuwait. The aim is to study how effective the law has been in achieving its objectives. The analysis is conducted through an exploration of e-commerce and transactions as addressed in Kuwaiti law. This law and its executive by-law were the first laws regulating e-transactions which emerged after an absence of any special laws regulating such matters. The main objective of this research defines the concept of e-commerce, its importance, its relationship to the law and the obstacles it confronts. The analysis also covers several legal issues arising from the emergence of e-commerce. There are legal issues for e-transactions listed in Law No. 20 of 2014, which includes e-contracts, e-signatures, privacy and data protection. Thus, it is important to identify shortcomings in the law affecting its required role. Finally, recommendations are put forward for the development of a legal framework. This research utilizes a comparative study approach to evaluate Law No. 20 of 2014. A comparison is done with relevant laws in the United Kingdom, which is more established in this area. Other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) laws are also considered whenever necessary. There are several laws in the UK that cover similar relevant issues to those addressed by Law No. 20 of 2014. Given the novelty of the law, judicial consideration cannot be assessed until a reasonable period has passed after application of its articles. The recent issue of laws related to e-transactions, including related technical terms, need be given attention at all levels of the judiciary. This must be done to ensure proper application of the law, public awareness, and knowledge in academic and educational circles.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Academic Units: The University of Leeds > Faculty of Education, Social Sciences and Law (Leeds) > School of Law (Leeds)
Depositing User: Mr Yousef Almutairi
Date Deposited: 08 May 2017 09:05
Last Modified: 08 May 2017 09:05
URI: http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/17077

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