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Language, literacy and technology: embodied peer-interaction and collaborative writing in an ESOL classroom

Woulds, Stephen (2015) Language, literacy and technology: embodied peer-interaction and collaborative writing in an ESOL classroom. PhD thesis, University of Leeds.

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Woulds_S_Education_PhD_2015.pdf - Final eThesis - complete (pdf)
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[img] Video (10 minute video of Kurdish male learners interacting at the computer)
Kurdish_1.7.mp4 - Supplementary Material
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[img] Video (video of a Kurdish male learner contesting the peer-interaction process at a shared computer)
Kurdish_3.4.mp4 - Supplementary Material
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[img] Video (A close-up video of Kurdish learners collaboratively writing on-screen)
Kurdish_writing.mp4 - Supplementary Material
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[img] Video (10 minute video of Polish female learners interacting at the computer)
Polish_1.7.mp4 - Supplementary Material
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Abstract

This study focuses on digital literacies, and real-time multimodal design, within the context of migrant adult learners in the UK. It seeks to understand the frameworks of peer-interaction when second-language learners are paired at a computer and how they negotiate second-language writing. In this research, pairs of students sharing the same language were tasked with an environmental project which included the digital design of an image, designing a four-page booklet using Publisher, a website and to produce all of these using English as a second language. The process was videoed across a threehour classroom session with four pairs of learners: Kurdish, Polish, French and Arabic. New literacies, embodied peer-interaction and second-language writing are the primary fields informing this research. The outcomes of the research are: (1) a methodology is developed for the collection and analysis of multimodal data when learners collaborate at a computer; (2) the field of new literacies is extended through an analysis of the design-process, as opposed to product-analysis; (3) a peer-interaction framework is presented which broadens our understanding of classroom interaction, including linguistic, paralinguistic and mediating resources when learners share technology; (4) the field of second-language writing is extended through an analysis of peer-writing with technology. The research concludes with a peer-interaction framework comprised of learner alignment and misalignment across language, literacy and technology. Spoken and written language goes through an iterative cycle of transformation. The central finding from the research is the naming and defining of transmodal talk within a peer-interaction framework. The sequentiality of this process has common features across all the pairs of learners. Transmodal talk is presented to identify the fluid process of transposing off-screen dialogue to on-screen text. They both shape and mediate each other through temporal mapping and polyvocality.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Keywords: multimodality, collaboration, technology, ESOL, second language
Academic Units: The University of Leeds > Faculty of Education, Social Sciences and Law (Leeds) > School of Education (Leeds)
Identification Number/EthosID: uk.bl.ethos.695966
Depositing User: Dr Stephen Woulds
Date Deposited: 25 Oct 2016 14:34
Last Modified: 25 Jul 2018 09:53
URI: http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/15311

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