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Audio-visual technology in clinical practice, supervision, and professional development

Roe, Dawn T. (2016) Audio-visual technology in clinical practice, supervision, and professional development. DClinPsy thesis, University of Sheffield.

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Abstract

Literature review: The review considers whether video review and feedback (VRF) in clinical practice promotes competence development. Thirteen articles qualified for inclusion, focussing on three domains of clinical competence; (i) communication, (ii) assessment, and (iii) supervision. There was evidence of a link between VRF and competency development, and VRF was experienced positively by participants, who found it a useful way to learn and develop. Implications for the role of VRF in training, clinical practice, and research are discussed. Research report: The research study reports a qualitative exploration of the experience of routinely using audio-visual technology (AVT) in clinical practice. Eight Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy (ISTDP) practitioners participated in semi-structured interviews that were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Three superordinate themes emerged from the data: Immersion, Revelation, and Transformation. Self-practice of therapeutic techniques, experiential learning, increased self-awareness and reflective practices appear to be integral processes in professional development. Feedback from peers and clinical supervisors is recognised to play a fundamental role in these processes. Implications for the role of AVT in training, clinical practice, and research are discussed.

Item Type: Thesis (DClinPsy)
Academic Units: The University of Sheffield > Faculty of Science (Sheffield) > Psychology (Sheffield)
Depositing User: Miss Dawn T. Roe
Date Deposited: 07 Nov 2016 11:41
Last Modified: 07 Nov 2016 11:41
URI: http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/14394

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