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Gender,nature and dominance : an analysis of interconnections between patriarchy and anthroparchy, using examples of meat and pornography

Cudworth, Erika (1998) Gender,nature and dominance : an analysis of interconnections between patriarchy and anthroparchy, using examples of meat and pornography. PhD thesis, University of Leeds.

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Abstract

This thesis investigates the relationship between gender and ecology. It conceptualizes relations of difference and inequality socially constructed upon gender and nature as part of specific systems of oppression: patriarchy (male domination) and anthroparchy (human domination of the environment). It does not see these oppressions as isolated, but as relatively autonomous and interconnected. It critiques green theory as gender-blind, and feminist theory, with the exception of eco-feminism, as nature-blind. Drawing upon analyses within eco-feminism, radical feminism and other literature in sociology, it develops a dual systems approach in order to examine the relationship between patriarchy and anthroparchy as one characterized both by harmony and mutual reinforcement, and by conflict and difference in terms of the forms dominance assumes and the degrees to which such forms may operate. The thesis is substantiated via comparison of two contemporary case studies: meat and pornography, which are examined as cultural phenomena (regimes of representations), and as industries. Green theory has seen meat as ‘speciesist’ (discriminating against Other animals on the basis of species membership), and radical feminism has largely understood pornography as a patriarchal construction. This thesis attempts to show the problems with such approaches, and argues the specific instances of oppression of meat and pornography involve the articulation of both patriarchy and anthroparchy, although these oppressive systems operate in different forms, to different degrees, and at different levels, depending on case and context.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Academic Units: The University of Leeds > Faculty of Education, Social Sciences and Law (Leeds) > School of Sociology and Social Policy (Leeds)
Identification Number/EthosID: uk.bl.ethos.684495
Depositing User: Digitisation Studio Leeds
Date Deposited: 06 May 2016 10:56
Last Modified: 06 Oct 2016 14:42
URI: http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/12998

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