To what extent can the use of ‘story’ provide the basis for an effective English language learning programme for five to eleven year old French students learning English as a foreign language

Ahmed Virjee, Geneffa ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3820-6835 (2019) To what extent can the use of ‘story’ provide the basis for an effective English language learning programme for five to eleven year old French students learning English as a foreign language. PhD thesis, University of York.

Abstract

Metadata

Keywords: Young Learners; YL; young learners; CEFR; A1 level; speaking skills; CEFR A1 speaking skills; Common European Framework of Reference; CEFR A1 qualitative-spoken language level; English foreign language; EFL; oral communicative skills; longitudinal; case study group; primary school learners; story; 'story'; 'story approach'; classroom teaching; teacher characteristics for young learners; primary school classroom teaching; restricted target language contexts; restricted EFL contexts; young learner restricted contexts; teaching approach; classroom teaching strategies; classroom teaching materials; classroom teaching activities; foreign language teaching; SLA; English second language; child development theories; child development; importance of meaning within child development; first language acquisition theories; EFL pedagogy; theoretical framework; cross-sectional studies; meaning; formulaic speech; spontaneous language; creative language; Common European Framework; French Ministry of Education; primary school children; French primary school English foreign language learners; effective learning; outcome assessment; assessment for young learners; evaluation of young learner EFL skills; children;
Awarding institution: University of York
Academic Units: The University of York > Department of Education (York)
Depositing User: Mrs Geneffa Ahmed Virjee
Date Deposited: 10 May 2021 17:57
Last Modified: 10 May 2021 17:57

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