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Human happiness versus urban biodiversity? Public perception of designed urban planting in a warming climate

Hoyle, Helen E (2015) Human happiness versus urban biodiversity? Public perception of designed urban planting in a warming climate. PhD thesis, University of Sheffield.

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Abstract

This study focused on public perception and preference in relation to a range of typologies of woodland, shrub and herbaceous designed urban planting defined by planting structure and species character. An initial on-site questionnaire was conducted with a large sample of respondents, (n = 1410), at 31 sites in England, followed by in-depth interviews with a much smaller self-selecting sub-set of the original respondents, (n = 34). Findings indicated that planting structure, species character and flowering all had a significant bearing on perceptions of the attractiveness, neatness and the biodiversity of the planting. Respondents’ background socio-demographic factors, beliefs and values had a lesser influence on their reactions to the planting, and were also related to self-reported well-being. Relationships between perceived attractiveness, perceived biodiversity and well-being were identified.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Keywords: public perception, preference, urban planting, well-being, perceived biodiversity
Academic Units: The University of Sheffield > Faculty of Social Sciences (Sheffield)
The University of Sheffield > Faculty of Social Sciences (Sheffield) > Landscape (Sheffield)
Identification Number/EthosID: uk.bl.ethos.669630
Depositing User: Dr Helen E Hoyle
Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2015 15:42
Last Modified: 03 Oct 2016 12:19
URI: http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/id/eprint/10738

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